Accessories

Tula samovar: the heritage of the nation

It is not known for certain where exactly the first samovar appeared in Russia It is not known for certain where exactly the first samovar appeared in Russia Almost any museum of antiquity cannot do without such an object as a samovar. Pictures are immediately presented: a table with an openwork tablecloth, a samovar polished to a shine, tea in saucers and bagels in bundles. The story goes on, and some pictures do not lose their nostalgic warm mood.

Modern, this means, electric samovars are actively sold and bought, but samovars on wood, heat, are less common. But just such a Tula samovar became known all over the world..

Tula samovar: history

History claims that the Tula blacksmith Demidov, having gone to the Urals, took with him craftsmen who specialized in copper affairs. From this, historians conclude that already in those years in Tula there was a factory for the production of samovars..

The story comes down to 1778, when in Tula, on Shtykov Street, the Lisitsyn brothers built a samovar in the first samovar establishment. The brothers worked in a workshop run by their father Fyodor Lisitsyn. The brothers did not work alone for long, since it is known that already in 1803, 26 people worked in the workshop, that is, the workshop reached the status of a factory..

The factory had a high income – up to 1,500 rubles.

The Lisitsyn brothers made things that were really unique at that time and samovars with handles in the form of loops were far from their main masterpiece. The Lisitsyn brothers made things that were really unique at that time and samovars with handles in the form of loops were far from their main masterpiece. Egg-shaped samovars or barrels with dolphin cranes, rare and unique at that time, have become today keepers of the memory of the past era of calm and relaxed tea drinking Egg-shaped samovars or barrels with dolphin cranes, rare and unique at that time, have become today keepers of the memory of the past era of calm and relaxed tea drinking

It was a glorious time for the factory, and the brothers ensured themselves unforgettable in history, but today their works are not used for tea drinking, but decorate more than one museum. Including the Tula Museum of Samovars has an exhibit from the Lisitsyn brothers.

The history of the Russian samovar (video)

Factory production period of samovars

Many entrepreneurs of that time realized how profitable samovar business can be, and establishments for the production of samovars began to grow by leaps and bounds. Morozov, Popov, Medvedev – information about these manufacturers, who opened their production at the end of the eighteenth century, is known for certain.

At a time when the factory production of samovars was established, different parts and components could be made by different manufacturers. At a time when the factory production of samovars was established, different parts and components could be made by different manufacturers.

Already in 1808, there were as many as eight samovar factories in Tula. And soon, in 1812, the factory of the Lomov brothers was opened, who sold samovars by weight. It is known, for example, that a brass samovar had a price of 64 rubles per pood, but a red copper samovar had a price of 90 rubles..

The Lomovs managed to produce 2372 samovars per year! In comparison, the same Lisitsyn – only 320.

Tula glorified at the end of the nineteenth century samovars from the manufacturer Batashev. By the way, the Batashevs are namesakes, although many consider this name to be almost a samovar dynasty.

Samovar factory Batashev

Batashev’s samovars were produced at ten factories! Vasily Stepanovich Batashev opened the largest samovar factory in 1840. The merit of Vasily Stepanovich can be attributed to the charter, which was created by the partnership of the steam samovar factory of the heirs of that same Vasily Stepanovich. And already at the beginning of the last century, the factory of Vasily Batashev’s heirs produced as many as 54 types of samovars.

Samovars of Batashev are a stamp of real quality. They sold out well, and at foreign exhibitions there was a huge demand for them..

The Tula Museum has a large collection of samovars from Vasily Batashev. Among this splendor is a samovar, a Florentine vase made of red copper, and souvenir samovars for the royal family. The Tula Museum has a large collection of samovars from Vasily Batashev. Among this splendor is a samovar, a Florentine vase made of red copper, and souvenir samovars for the royal family.

Today antique fire samovars from Vasily Batashev are the envy of collectors, antique samovars are very expensive.

Samovar Batasheva (video review)

Museum “Tula Samovars”

This museum began work in 1990, not far from the Tula Kremlin.

The museum has placed the exhibits in two halls:

  • First hall. Masterpieces of the Tula samovar craft of the 18-19 centuries, in addition to samovars, there are also medals from various Russian and international exhibitions.
  • Second hall. There you can also see samovars from the second half of the 19th century, early 20th century. In addition to samovars from famous manufacturers, the museum also presents products of the Soviet era, including samovars manufactured by the Shtamp plant..

Anyone who admires samovar craft should definitely visit this unique museum. Anyone who admires samovar craft should definitely visit this unique museum.

Tula plant “Stamp”

In the last century, the Tula cartridge plant gained fame and glory. In addition to samovars, he produced teapots, stoves, dishes, machine tools, etc. In the mid-thirties, the cartridge plant produced products of 64 nomenclature names.

In 1943 the cartridge plant was renamed “Stamp”. During the war, the plant produced military products, and after the victory it returned to its former names, only the usual coal samovars pressed new samples.

Before the war, the production of samovars was established at the plant, during the hostilities, the plant was redesigned for the production of ammunition, and in the post-war period, the traditional device of samovars was replaced by electric models. Before the war, the production of samovars was established at the plant, during the hostilities, the plant was redesigned for the production of ammunition, and in the post-war period, the traditional device of samovars was replaced by electric models.

In the 50s of the last century, the Shtamp plant began to produce electric samovars. The mass relocation of people to the city, to apartment buildings, entailed a completely natural circumstance – there was no place for a samovar on wood, but electrical models became in demand. The plant was rebuilt in time to release a new model with an electric heater.

Antique samovars on the wood today

Are wood-fired samovars used today? Of course, not as massively as electric ones, but they are still used. However, a wood-fired samovar and coal samovars are one and the same.

The wood-fired samovar contains:

  • Body or water tank;
  • Jug;
  • Cover with a hole;
  • Hotplate for a teapot;
  • Faucet.

Antique fire or charcoal samovars are usually made of copper, while modern wood-fired samovars are more often made of brass. Antique fire or charcoal samovars are usually made of copper, while modern wood-fired samovars are more often made of brass.

A wood-fired samovar can be melted with coal or charcoal, cones, branches, chocks. Only now cones in a wood-fired samovar need to be added at the very end, for aroma and haze.

What a modern person needs to know about samovars (video)

Gingerbread and samovar

Printed gingerbread – another pride of Russia, Tula gingerbread is the most famous of the printed gingerbread.

The roots of Tula gingerbread go back to the seventeenth century, and gingerbread is still popular today..

Gingerbread and samovar are symbols of Tula. Having never visited this city, not even knowing its location, everyone knows about Tula gingerbread and Tula samovars Gingerbread and samovar are symbols of Tula. Having never visited this city, not even knowing its location, everyone knows about Tula gingerbread and Tula samovars

Outwardly, they are either rectangular tiles or flat shapes. Jam and condensed milk are used as a filling in gingerbread. Several modern Tula enterprises produce gingerbread. There is even a monument to such a hotel..

How to clean a samovar (video)

Samovars are a product that can often be found in modern interiors. What is it, for the sake of tradition or “well forgotten old”? The main thing is that many people still associate the samovar with family tea drinking, hospitality, conversations and heartfelt gatherings. This means that today the samovar is more than an old teapot, and the property and pride of the people.

Tula samovar (photo)